Horniman Museum

RCUK – Using marine microprocessor technologies and environmental sensors to investigate environmental spawning cues of scleractinian corals in captivity.

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This is one of a series of projects I entered an abstract and poster for at the Reef Conservation UK Conference this year, I’m very excited to have the opportunity to work on this project.

Using marine microprocessor technologies and environmental sensors to investigate environmental spawning cues of scleractinian corals in captivity. A collaboration between the Horniman Museum & Gardens & ZSL Conservation Programmes
J, Craggs1, Gary Fletcher2

The ex-situ settlement and growth of sexually produced coral planula larvae has great potential as a technique that can aid coral reef restoration efforts and provide a supply of highly sustainable cultured corals for the aquarium industry. The precise environmental cues that trigger corals to spawn in captivity however remain largely unknown. Taking advantage of the latest marine microprocessor technologies and environmental sensors, this investigation aims to better understand these spawning cues in captivity and will investigate the influences of the lunar cycle, diurnal changes, seasonal temperature changes and nutritional input on gamete production and release.
Through this work it is proposed the development of an underwater detection camera to track releasing of gametes from broadcast spawners and planula in brooding corals enabling remote observation possibilities in the future.

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Reef Conservation UK – Using “Citizen Science” to journal coral spawning in hobbyist and public aquaria

Posted on Updated on

Image

This is one of a series of projects I entered an abstract and poster for at the Reef Conservation UK Conference this year, I’m very excited to have the opportunity to work on this project.

Using “Citizen Science” to journal coral spawning in hobbyist and public aquaria. A collaboration between the Horniman Museum & Gardens & ZSL Conservation Programmes
J, Craggs1, Gary Fletcher2, Alasdair Davies3

An increasing amount of both hard and soft corals are spawning successfully in aquaria. Some species may not yet been scientifically documented. ZSL to date have developed a number of “Citizen Science” projects where communities may be leveraged upon to create trends for hypothesis and investigation. This project involves the creating and marketing of an internet based “Coral Spawning Journal” which will record user contributed images and video as well as environmental variables such as temperature, pH, alkalinity, salinity, date, nutritional input and lunar cycle variables where available. The project aims to identify catalysts and trends in spawning activities for further investigation as well as providing an educational resource for promoting husbandry techniques based on findings as well as a list of guidelines for participants to look for.
The project would benefit from contributions from RCUK academics that have documented coral spawning and would like to contribute to the initial editorial content of the journal.